Jagged Worldviews

The world can be viewed in dozens of different ways. Primarily, in the western world it is easy to fall into an ‘us’ and ‘them’ narrative. We think this way, they think that way. Leroy Little Bear breaks down the Western worldview and Aboriginal worldview in his book Reclaiming Indigenous Voice and Vision. He explains each worldview clearly and exhibits great analysis of both. In the end he speaks of the loss of culture within the Indigenous community and how worldviews of their ancestors are colliding with the western worldview. Making room in society for multiple worldviews is important now more than ever as Canada continues to grow and diversify.

From Leroy Little Bear’s article I learned of many aspects of Indigenous Worldview. For Aboriginal people time moves in a cyclical fashion. I could spend all of my time learning about the different ways in which people experience time, and how they view the notions of past, present, and future.

Image of North Dakota pipeline protests
North Dakota Pipeline Protest

Leroy Little Bear explained the fascinating Indigenous belief that all things on this earth are connected as one by a moving spirit. In turn, this would give life to what westerns would believe are inanimate objects. I learned that this particular way of viewing the world instills a more respectful attitude in regards to the natural world. It is not only reflected in Little Bear’s writing but when looking to the causes that many Indigenous communities support, many of them fight for the preservation of wildlife.

I also learned that embracing many aspects from multiple worldviews is important in building your own personal outlook on life. It is easy to follow the crowd and believe what others tell you to believe, but to form an opinion that is truly your own, you must take multiple different parts and work them together. The same goes for worldview. As Leroy Little Bear outlined in his book, with the loss of Indigenous worldview and the adoption of western beliefs leaves many Indigenous people at a loss. They often find themselves molding the two worldviews together to create a belief that is cohesive to them individually while staying true to their people.

As the Colton Boushie case moves through Canada, people are facing the underlying conflict between Aboriginal people and non-Aboriginal citizens. This takes me back to an Indigenous 100 class I took in my first semester. In this class we discussed the slow change of the Canadian legal system to incorporate Indigenous worldview in court such as verbal accounts. This clashing reminds me of Leroy Little Bear’s work because he writes about worldviews clashing across many cultures. I am puzzled over how much molding and shaping worldviews will go through, and excited to see the reflection of old worldviews in new ones.

The question that I end this reading with is one that I often ponder, even before reading this article. Upon learning of different worldviews I wonder that if two people who live within completely different worldviews are still living in the same world?

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